For many people, the first session with a psychologist is full of uncertainty. Are they able to help me? Does psychotherapy actually work? Will I be “cured” after this? It is important to clarify the role that psychotherapy can play on your journey to improved well-being. Psychologists can guide you in self-exploration, understanding your struggle, and finding ways to manage and release your challenges. However, each session is only the
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At the heart of any successful therapy lies the therapeutic alliance. The working relationship you have built with your psychologist will guide every session and interaction with them. Studies show that clients who perceived their psychologist as empathetic and truly invested in achieving positive outcomes for their wellbeing, made faster and better progress than those who did not. In fact, empathy and interpersonal connection seem to outrank both professional competence
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Often we see ourselves engaging in dysfunctional behavioural patterns and know that they are not good for us, but we still struggle to break out of them. Why is it so difficult to implement positive change? We have practiced some of these behaviours over many years, again and again. This repetition strengthens the corresponding pathway in our brains, making the behaviour easier to access and perform. Practice makes perfect, right?
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Many clients come into therapy because they find their emotions overwhelming. In particular, anxiety, anger, and pain can be hard to manage and can severely interfere with people’s lives. As a result, we tend to want to avoid these negative feelings. Unfortunately, the more we try to avoid them, the louder they will typically speak: Often the reason they have become overwhelming is because we have been trying to run
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We may often feel pain around our bodies that triggered by various types of stimulation, such as heat, cold, pressure, skin damage, illness, injury – even heartbreaks have been recognized as pain that can be felt physically. But have you ever thought about pain felt in a body part that no longer exists? This kind of pain is known as phantom limb pain, which is often experienced by individuals who
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When clients are driven to therapy by unwanted, overwhelming, negative emotions, I frequently ask clients how these emotions feel in their body. I would guess that 7 out of 10 struggle to describe physical sensations related to emotion. ‘It’s more in my head, my thoughts’ or ‘it’s not physical, it’s just that I know’. But how do you know you are experiencing an emotion? Emotions are physical. The first sign
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